Home Elevator Maintenance Checklist

Do you have an elevator in your home? To ensure it continues to run properly, you need to practice home elevator maintenance just as you would for a car. Think of it as preventative care. If you can spot a problem with the elevator early, you can address it, and it won’t grow into a bigger issue. So how do you know what you should be looking for?

Proper Maintenance Checklist From Home Elevator Professionals

We’ve put together a checklist you can follow to ensure you give every part of the elevator proper care. Set aside time to do this inspection regularly, and work methodically through each piece of the checklist.

Inside the Cab

Complete these five steps inside the cab:

  1. Test and replace any burned-out indicator lights.
  2. Look over the walls, handrails and ceiling of the cab and note any damage, such as scratches or cracks.
  3. Examine the deceleration, acceleration and leveling accuracy of the cab while it’s in motion, if anything it out of whack, it may require some adjustments.
  4. Test the door restrictor. If it isn’t working the right way, you should find an elevator specialist to make some small repairs.
  5. Watch the door open and close. Does it bounce or slam? It should go back and forth smoothly.

Did you note anything you couldn’t fix yourself? Start a running list of issues with the elevator. At the end of your checklist, you may need to call in a professional to assist you, and it will help if you can tell them exactly what the problems are.

Outside the Cab

Use these three steps to check the outside of the cab:

  1. Look over the lights and hall stations, swapping out any that aren’t working.
  2. Examine the clearances and the door panel.
  3. Test the Phase 1 firefighters’ service to ensure it works.

Drive System

Before you begin these three steps for the drive system, get anything that isn’t supposed to be in the machine room out. Next:

  1. Measure your oil levels, adding some if they’re low.
  2. Search electrical components to see if they have overheated or failed.
  3. Look for leaks, vibration or wear on other components, and lubricate them if needed.

The drive system may require professional assistance if you note anything wrong. While you can probably change out lights and add oil yourself, more complex issues should be handled by someone with experience because you might make the problem worse if you handle it yourself.

Top of Cab

The top of the cab requires a patient examination. Complete these six steps in order:

  1. Dust off anything that may have accumulated on the top of the cab.
  2. Inspect the function of the inspection station and stop switch.
  3. Look over all the components within your view, including leveling devices and rollers.
  4. Examine the door operator to make sure it functions correctly.
  5. Search for signs of wear on the traveling cables. Test connections to make sure they work.
  6. Look carefully for evidence of rodents or vandalism in the hoistway. This step is also a good time to ensure fire safety in the space.

Pit

Finally, your last stop should be checking out the pit using the following six steps:

  1. Check for leaks.
  2. Search for corrosion on the spring buffers, and check that they align properly.
  3. Inspect switches, safeties, rollers and all other visible components for wear.
  4. Examine the travel cable for pinches or snags.
  5. Test the GFI outlet, stop switch and lights.
  6. Finish by looking at the sump pump and making that it’s functioning correctly.

How to Find a Home Elevator Maintenance Expert

After your self-check, you may need someone to help you with repairs or take a second look at a component. Contact us to discuss your needs.